Posted on Leave a comment

COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHT

Fall 2021

COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHT

Stay Park City Cycling

Featuring:

John Allison & Ian Jones

STAY PARK CITY CYCLING

Stay Park City Cycling (SPCC) is an all-inclusive cycling club based out of Park City, UT focusing on road, gravel, and mountain bike riding and racing. All are welcome. SPCC is composed of riders that are casual cyclists, elite amateurs, retired world class professionals, to folks who just enjoy coffee shop rides. The text on the cycling club’s webpage says it best:
“Be fit. Be Your Fastest. Have Fun”

STAY PARK CITY CYCLING

Stay Park City Cycling (SPCC) is an all-inclusive cycling club based out of Park City, UT focusing on road, gravel, and mountain bike riding and racing. All are welcome. SPCC is composed of riders that are casual cyclists, elite amateurs, retired world class professionals, to folks who just enjoy coffee shop rides. The text on the cycling club’s webpage says it best:
“Be fit. Be Your Fastest. Have Fun”

FEATURED RIDER

John Allison

Ride leader, avid competitor, and consummate professional – we sat down with John Allison to discuss what stay park city cycling has given the community, and what cycling has given him. 

Ventum:
What does SPCC offer the community?

John:
The Race Team – SPCC’s race team mission is to help young racers, support the multitude of group rides that SPCC hosts, and foster an interest in competitive cycling through education and mentorship of club members.
The Cycling Club, overall: I believe that SPCC offers the cycling community a place where every cyclist can feel welcome on our group rides and social events. Our members probably enjoy some of the best benefits from our fantastic sponsors like discounts on everything from fantastic chocolate, training, cycling gear and everything in between. This year, SPCC supported one of the rest stops at the National Ability Centers’ Summit Challenge Bike Ride (1st place for best rest stop!) and is supporting a bike drive through the Bike Collective to get bikes and gear to underserved communities. 

Ventum:
What is your role at SPCC? 

John:
I have several different volunteer roles and really enjoy all of them.  In no particular order, I am SPCC’s race team coordinator, weekend group ride leader, and probably my favorite (while sometimes a stressful role) is organizing our spring training camp in southern Utah. It’s a ton of fun getting a few dozen of us out of the snowy Wasatch Mountains and into the sunny south before the cycling season begins!

Ventum:
What aspect of the sport do you find most appealing?

John:
Freedom…the feeling of freedom is what I like most about cycling, that when you get on a bike it feels like there are endless possibilities about where you can go and how far. The speed is perfect too, walking/running are a bit too slow and being in a car is too fast to take in the scenery – cycling is the perfect speed.

Ventum: 
How did you find SPCC? 

John:
I was doing a number of the group rides in the SLC/PC area looking for a cycling club to ride with and the SPCC group ride was the first one that made me feel really welcome. I still remember Mike “The Mayor” McGurl (SPCC sponsor and board member) buying me a coffee and pastry after my first group ride with them.

Ventum:
How did this past year shape up for you – race wise, cycling personal goals?

John:
It went really well actually! My first goal was just being able to race because of all the COVID cancellations of 2020. I’m a recovering road bike racer so my goals this year were to do a full season of mountain bike racing. I surprised myself with getting a few wins this year and getting on the podium of a really long, hard event like Park City Point 2 Point.
My second goal, which was a personal cycling goal, was to do 1 million feet of climbing in a calendar year (must be outdoors, no e-bikes, and non-virtual – sorry, Zwifters!). As an almost complete non-climber at 5’7 and 154lbs it took me 304 days to complete, but it’s done – yay!

Ventum:
What do you have planned for 2022?

John:
When it comes to racing, I’ll probably do another full season of mountain bike racing but I’d also like to do a little bit more traveling for races. The BWR race in California looks really awesome and I’d really like to hit some of the more low-key gravel races that seem to be popping up all over the Intermountain West. 



FEATURED RIDER

Ian Jones

Project manager, engineer, coffee-addict, and avid bike racer –
We sat down with Ian to discuss how he found the sport, SPCC and more.

Ventum:
How did you find SPCC?
Ian:
I found SPCC while during a small charity group ride in Park City during the Tour of Utah and started chatting with a younger club member. The following season I went to there first Sunday group ride of the season and felt really welcomed during and after the ride by every club member I met that day. 

Ventum:
How long have you been a cyclist? What aspect of the sport do you find most appealing?
Ian:
I’ve been a cyclist for 4 years now, I got into cycling at 26, after moving to Salt Lake City from the east coast. The aspects I find most appealing are the cycling community’s support of riders of all levels, the ability to push your limits during training and races, and the physical and mental health benefits.

Ventum:
How did this past year shape up for you – race wise, cycling personal goals? 

Ian:
This year went really well, which didn’t come without it’s highs and lows. My race season consisted of all gravel races, with my two big focuses being Steamboat Grvl and Crushar in the Tushar, both of which I exceeded my performance and personal goals, and were a blast! I also raced Fistful of Dirt, BWR Cedar City, and Paris-Roubear, maybe next year I’ll add the Wasatch All-Road to the calendar. Unfortunately The Mid South gravel race was canclled, but I’ll be on the start line in 2022. All said and done this year wasn’t all about the results on the bike, but was about having fun during the race and enjoying the party and gravel community after.

Posted on Leave a comment

COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHT

Fall 2021

COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHT

Triathlon: Trials and Training

ERIKA ACKERLUND

In Conversation

Winter, early 2020. 
It’s the start of the pandemic and Erika Ackerlund, a recent college-grad and ITU Distance triathlete, has just moved to Victoria, British Columbia. Where she will spend the foreseeable future training for a promising, up-coming season. Out for a training ride, much like any day as a triathlete – buried in the mundane of yet another interval, she allows her mind to wander to the idea of a promising career. 

She’s daydreaming. 
Her pedals turn, the snow falls. 
The road bends, her mind turns. 

The aspiration of a promising professional career in sport is brimming. Then, quicker than her recent descent, the first race of the season gets canceled. Then a second. And a third. Soon  thereafter, the entire WTS calendar gets put on hold. 

There’s a tension, an unknown. 

And then she lets go. 

Futility, perhaps. Fatalism, maybe. 

Yet here she still is; training, racing, fresh off a top-10 finish at WTS Hamburg. So, we sat down with Erika to discuss her humble beginnings in this sport, how she persisted during a time of uncertainty, and where her intentions lie.

VENTUM: How did you become a professional triathlete?

ERIKA: When I followed a presidential scholarship to the University of Montana, I was looking for ways to continue competitive sports. Having swam and ran in highschool, triathlon seemed like an interesting pursuit. I joined the very small team and thought triathlon would just be a college hobby. I didn’t even plan on getting a road bike. But, I met my now boyfriend Elliot through the club and he showed me how to train and loaned me the gear I needed to start. Right away I began finishing towards the front of local and collegiate races. When I earned my elite license during college, the idea of being a professional athlete was incredibly exciting. 

 

VENTUM: Did you immediately want to go pro? 

ERIKA: I immediately wanted to go pro, but hadn’t necessarily realized how much that would mean giving up my other life and academic aspirations. I think making the choice to dedicate myself to one thing, triathlon, has been the harder aspect mentally than wondering if I would be fast enough to make it. I have no idea where my confidence that I could swim, bike, and run fast enough came from because at that point I wasn’t fast enough to even be considered by the USA Triathlon recruitment programs.

VENTUM: Your career has been stifled by the pandemic, especially given when you turned pro. When did you realize your triathlon career would be adversely affected by the pandemic? 

ERIKA: I had moved to Victoria, British Columbia in 2019 and was planning on basing there year-round for the foreseeable future. My first race of 2020 was cancelled around March and not long after the entire World Triathlon schedule was put on hold. Victoria shut down very quickly. I lost all pool access and the lakes were too cold to swim in until mid- May. Initially, I took a day or two to sit in bed and watch Netflix, but then I got back to bike and run training and from there hardly took a day off all summer.

VENTUM: How did this affect your outlook on racing?

ERIKA: My initial outlook on the pandemic was a bit unique. 2019 had been my first season out of college and racing full-time. It had gone horribly. I was on-off sick all year and it wasn’t until the season ended that I discovered it was allergies and learned to handle them.

So come the start of 2020, I was starting to re-build my base  mileage but was still very nervous I would get sick any day. My general fitness wasn’t incredibly high and I was always wondering if I should just look for a job instead. So to have an entire spring and summer with no option but to train consistently was a bit of a relief.  I came out of it with more fitness than I’e ever had and confident that I could not only train without getting sick, but train like the best girls in the world do.

VENTUM: Any decisive moment that made you stick with pursuing triathlon?

ERIKA: There have probably been many, but the most recent would be my top 10 finish at Hamburg World Triathlon Championship Series 2021. I think everyone cherishes their first WTCS top 10.

VENTUM: When you realized racing would return, how did that feel? What race did you do first?

ERIKA: Early August the start list for WTS Hamburg came out and I was honestly shocked to even make the list given my world ranking at the time. It brought some big decisions for me because if I left Canada where I was living and training, I wasn’t going to be allowed back in given the new restrictions. Elliot and I made the decision to forgo our lease there and come back to the US so I could have the opportunity to go race. It wasn’t an easy decision though, because we loved where we were living and I had great training options and lakes for open water swimming, so if the race didn’t happen we would have regretted it massively.

 

I can’t say I really believed I would be racing until l actually landed in Europe. That whole week pre-race I was incredibly, incredibly nervous. My side – story is that I had only started one WTS level event before. In that race, I had swam so badly that by the time I got onto the bike I was already far behind and ended up being lapped out of the race. Fast forward to 2020 and I found myself lining up for just my second WTS race (which at the last minute was also named 2020 Elite World Championships) when swimming had been the most impacted sport during the pandemic. That summer, I swam almost entirely in lakes and about half of the time I was by myself using my watch’s beeper to tell me when to start and stop intervals. I learned to embrace open water swimming more and more, but it is a completely different style of training to being in a pool where you know the exact pace of every 100m throughout practice.

 

I raced Hamburg purely out of fear of being last, and while I probably shouldn’t recommend that strategy, I had the best race of my life. I finished 14th and had spent part of the bike ride right up there with the lead pack. Seeing names like Duffy, Zafares, Beaugrand, and many others I look up to on the suits around me really validated the training I had done all summer.

VENTUM: What do you look forward to most in races? When is your next race?

ERIKA: Most of the time I am concentrating too hard to really think much until the race is over. But now and then, during a good race, I’ll have moments of feeling fast and in control, and I’ll see the cameras or spectators watching, and remember that I’m doing something I used to watch and fangirl over on tv. That’s pretty cool. 

WTCS Abu Dhabi on November 5! Looking at the start list, it’s going to be a fast and exciting race with the gold and silver olympic medalists and long course phenom Lucy Charles all lining up.

Posted on Leave a comment

DEV STORY

Ventum_Icon_White

Fall 2021

INTRODUCING THE ALL-NEW VENTUM ONE

The Future of Speed, Refined

DEVELOPING THE ALL-NEW VENTUM ONE

The overall goal when developing this bike was to take an already innovative product in the Ventum One and refine it through improved aerodynamics, increased fit options, and more customization.

REDESIGNED FRONT-END

The new Ventum One has a completely redesigned front-end to ensure better fit, form, and function. The frame is compatible with both Shimano and SRAM. The new aerobar now sits atop a single infinitely adjustable riser with 70mm of range. The softer forearm pads are mounted to reversible cups with 64 possible mounting configurations. Forearm position can also tilt through a range of  +/- 20 degrees.

REDESIGNED FRONT-END

Cable management is improved through the new improved aerobar stem. Front and rear hydraulic brake hoses are routed down the single riser into the integrated stem cover. The base bar can be flipped high or low so riders can customize the reach between the aerobars and the brake levers.

INCREASED STOPPING POWER

By adding disc brakes we have increased lever modulation and increased maximum braking power. Disc brake rotors have superior heat dissipation compared to carbon rims so riders can expect less brake fade and improved performance in the rain.

INCREASED STOPPING POWER

Without Compromise

We avoided any compromises in aerodynamics by increasing the clearance between the fork and the tires. The flow of air is less constricted, resulting in lower drag. The frame can now accommodate a maximum tire width of 28mm.

IMPROVED AERODYNAMIC DETAIL

The design of the stem cover is an example of how much thought was placed into every detail of the bike. In isolation, the single aerobar riser has than the standard two pylon design. However seen as a system – the double pylons have the aerodynamic advantage as they are mounted on the base-bar with no other structures underneath them.

THE FUTURE OF SPEED, REFINED

Posted on Leave a comment

FALL ’21

PERFORMANCE | DESIGN | INNOVATION 

Fall ’21

Ventum_Icon_White

Fall 2021

PERFORMANCE

IN

AUTUMN RIDING DEMANDS VERSATILITY

Regardless of your chosen path, the Ventum GS1 allows you to tackle a variety of surfaces with confidence. Dial in your ride with the Ventum Dual-Offset Fork and choose between a variety of tire sizes.

RIDE WHERE YOU WANT

To go from predictable road to unstable dirt, you need a bike prepared to handle new terrain with confidence. Developed with a geometry-first approach,  the Ventum GS1 meets the unique demands of gravel riding.

PERFORMANCE GRAVEL IS HERE